UNCG Research

Human Development and Family Studies earns top ranking


Posted on Tuesday, November 11th, 2014 by UNCG Research.
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Repost from UNCG NOW

The graduate program in the UNCG Department of Human Development and Family Studies (HDFS) has earned a Top 10 ranking in The HDFS Report, an inaugural ranking of programs in the field.

UNCG’s graduate program tied for seventh place and was first in North Carolina in the ranking of the overall reputation and quality among the 52 doctoral-granting HDFS departments in North America. In the specific area of child development, UNCG’s department tied for fourth place.

The rankings were released by Clair Kamp Dush, Ph.D, an associate professor of human development and family science at The Ohio State University. Dush wrote that, to her knowledge, the list was the first publically available ranking of human development and family science programs.

“We are very pleased that our graduate program has been rated so highly in the very first systematic and comprehensive rating of Ph.D. granting HDFS programs in North America,” said Mark Fine, Ph.D, chair of UNCG’s department. “This recognition by HDFS scholars in the United States and Canada suggests that our efforts to train the next generation of researchers and practitioners in human development and family studies are on the right track.”

The UNCG Department of Human Development and Family Studies seeks to enhance the quality of life for individuals across the lifespan within their diverse and changing relationships, families, social networks and communities. The department is housed in the UNCG School of Health and Human Sciences.

“Faculty in the UNCG Department of Human Development and Family Studies are teaching the next generation of child development professionals, engaging in outstanding child and family research, directing the Child Care Education Program on campus, and administering the rated license project for early child care in North Carolina,” said Celia Hooper, Ph.D., dean of the UNCG School of Health and Human Sciences. “Leaders in the state and nation look to this department for guidance.”